Who Wants to be Famous? - Day 335

Here’s this week’s question from the Ask the Artists series:

If you knew for certain it was attainable for you, would you want to become famous for your art?

Bald Hill 2 by Howard Bruner. Copyright © Howard Bruner

"Bald Hill 2" by Howard Bruner. Copyright © Howard Bruner

“Absolutely. Name recognition is very important to the buying public. But I would embrace fame as a promiscuous lover – never quite letting myself trust totally.”

Howard Bruner, Oregon
Painting, sculpture
Howard Bruner

Reach by Lisa Koschwitz Salerno. Copyright © Lisa Koschwitz Salerno

"Reach" by Lisa Koschwitz Salerno. Copyright © Lisa Koschwitz Salerno

“I wouldn’t mind becoming famous for my art. Being well known for my work would mean that my story is being told, and therefore my art would be doing its job. I don’t see success in art as a negative thing, as long as I feel as though my work is still authentic to my intentions, and that individuals are still moved by the messages that I am trying to convey. Whatever an artist’s goals may be in terms of fame, etc., I believe that the one underlying reason why artists are driven to create is that we all share an intrinsic desire to create objects that will hopefully outlive us. It is an artist’s wish to leave one’s mark in this world, as to say, ‘I was here’.”

Lisa Koschwitz Salerno, New Hampshire
Painting
Lisa Koschwitz Salerno

Assemblage #11 by James Mullen. Copyright © James Mullen

Assemblage #11 by James Mullen. Copyright © James Mullen

“A large part of why I make art is to leave something of myself behind, so that my name will still be spoken long after my death.”

James Mullen, California
Sculpture
James Mullen

Library by Cecil William Lee. Copyright © Cecil William Lee

"Library" by Cecil William Lee. Copyright © Cecil William Lee

“I cannot say that being famous is an objective, but it would be nice. More importantly, I would like my Computer Evolved Photographic Art to be appreciated and seen internationally. Since the latter part of the 1900s, there have been a number of different forms of computer art. I would like to be known as one of the artists who influenced what was once called a passing trend that went on to become an art form historically referred to as a fine art form originating in the late 20th century.

Cecil William Lee, New York
Photographic and computer-evolved art
Cecil William Lee

Untitled by Craig Flowers. Copyright © Craig Flowers

Untitled by Craig Flowers. Copyright © Craig Flowers

“I would want to become famous for my work. I have been painting all my life and have struggled through much adversity. If I were to become famous for my work, my life history would also be known which would, in turn, be an example to encourage other artists, who experience hard times and rejection, to continue with their art.”

Craig Flowers, California
Painting
Craig Flowers

Untitled by Cristina Candel. Copyright © Cristina Candel

Untitled by Cristina Candel. Copyright © Cristina Candel

“I don´t really need to be famous. For me the most important thing is to be able to make a living from my work (as I have been doing for nineteen years), to earn enough money to have an studio, continue investigating different  photographic processes and to travel around the world taking pictures. My highest goal would be to be invited to exhibit my work in my favorite galleries around the world.”

Cristina Candel, Spain
Photography
Cristina Candel

No Place to Go by Sara Youngman. Copyright © Sara Youngman

"No Place to Go" by Sara Youngman. Copyright © Sara Youngman

“Of course! It took me 55 years to become an artist and I would like as many people as possible to see, enjoy and purchase my work. One assumes fortune would accompany fame which would take the burden of supply costs off my shoulders. To have the freedom to create without the worry about how many pieces of copper or sheets of paper or mat board I have left would be heaven.”

Sara Youngman, Michigan
Printmaking
Sara Youngman Creations

Conventional Wisdom by Jessica Eastburn. Copyright © Jessica Eastburn

Conventional Wisdom by Jessica Eastburn. Copyright © Jessica Eastburn

“I am not so interested in becoming famous for my art in terms of being an art celebrity figure like Damien Hirst or Jeff Koons. I am more concerned with my work gaining recognition and appreciation
from collectors, critics and institutions.”

Jessica Eastburn, California
Drawing, painting
Jessica Eastburn

Inner Erosion by Laurie Beth Finkelstein. Copyright © Laurie Beth Finkelstein

"Inner Erosion" by Laurie Beth Finkelstein. Copyright © Laurie Beth Finkelstein

“I absolutely would like to become famous for my work. It would be a kick! Really, that would be the ultimate confirmation that what I do as an artist matters. It would mean that what I create has an impact beyond my collectors and that my collectors have made a sound investment in addition to purchasing art that they love.”

Laurie Beth Finkelstein, California
Painting
Laurie Beth Finkelstein

Jenny by Richard Tourtelot. Copyright © Richard Tourtelot

"Jenny" by Richard Tourtelot. Copyright © Richard Tourtelot

“I have never preoccupied myself with the notion of fame and I am not entirely certain it appeals to me. I always considered my works to be extremely personal and have created them for no one. In many ways, I am grateful this was my path as I never felt the need to ascribe to anyone’s ideologies of what art should be, or painted anything based on what I thought I could sell. Only recently have I come to recognize that my art should be shared. I’ve come to appreciate that we all share connectivity to the human experience, the tie that binds us as humans. It’s raw, it’s familiar and it lingers with a profound resonance.”

Richard Tourtelot, Florida
Painting
Richard Tourtelot

Nittany Lion Statue in Blue by Veronica Winters. Copyright © Veronica Winters

"Nittany Lion Statue in Blue" by Veronica Winters. Copyright © Veronica Winters

“Yes, I would like to be famous for my art, despite the fact that it sounds corny or funny. There is no other way around it if you have a healthy ambition and you are not in self-denial. Unfortunately, the creative professions are taken seriously only when you are famous. So it would not only be good for my self-esteem and self-worth but it would also serve a much greater purpose. I would be able to influence many people with my art and the ideas I put forward in my paintings. I’d be able to commit to philanthropic projects and create jobs in the art world for artists. I’d be able to paint huge canvases and exhibit them in cities for a public who wants and craves art.”

Veronica Winters, Pennsylvania
Painting and drawing
Veronica Winters

Hotrollers by Sheila Grabarsky. Copyright © Sheila Grabarsky

"Hotrollers" by Sheila Grabarsky. Copyright © Sheila Grabarsky

“Boy, oh boy would I love to pay back my husband for all his financial support of my art career over the years by enabling his early retirement! If fame would grant me that opportunity I’d welcome it. Otherwise, it is not my definition of success in my work.”

Sheila Grabarsky, New Jersey
Painting
Sheila Grabarsky

I was somewhat surprised at all the different versions of “fame”. Each artist sees it differently and the biggest reward still seems to be the art itself. Most artists want their work and their message to be shared with as many people as possible, and selling one painting or one sculpture at a time reaches only a limited audience. “Fame,” in its many variations, broadens that audience, giving artists the platform to share their work and inspire the world.

- SerenaK

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For those of you who are new to Artful Vagabond, I have made a resolution to write a year-long series of daily posts: A 365-Day Tribute to Artists and the Creative Mind.

Here’s the story behind these daily “resolutions”:

A Juicy New Year’s Resolution

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